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ominoturchino



Registrato: 07/06/04 01:43
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Ago 26, 2017 09:45    Oggetto: 26 agosto 2017 Sant'Alessandro - Capitano, Buon Onomastico! Rispondi citando




Benvenute! siete in Alessandro Preziosi official Forum








      Capitano Alessandro, splendido Onomastico!

          insieme agli affetti a te più cari

          con il tuo unico grande Forum!!


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Marisol



Registrato: 07/01/11 10:40
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Ago 26, 2017 12:18    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Mio carissimo Ale.....



Tanti baci con grande affetto da Madrid Razz Wink

TVTB Ale Wink Wink

Marisol

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bonar74



Registrato: 04/12/11 23:32
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Ago 26, 2017 12:35    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro
Buon Onomastico
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Pavla



Registrato: 19/10/14 17:23
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Ago 26, 2017 14:10    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Buon onomastico Alessandro

Tanti tanti auguri

Una dolce torta per te - Santa Maria del Fiore a Firenze


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Helena x



Registrato: 08/10/06 18:42
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Ago 26, 2017 15:09    Oggetto: ...CARO... Rispondi citando


CARO ALESSANDRO!

BUON ONOMASTICO.

TANTI AUGURI PER TE AD I TUOI CARI.


Helena...

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PATRICIA 22



Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
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MessaggioInviato: Ven Set 01, 2017 18:25    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


So very touching Alessandro!

Love ya!
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PATRICIA 22



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MessaggioInviato: Lun Set 04, 2017 19:10    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


In this letter Alessandro, A friend of Theo's wife is bad mouthing Vincent and pitying Theo. She and many in the family regarded Vincent's death as more of a relief instead of a misfortune. What a touching thing to say, eh? Now we know why Vincent had so many issues.


From: Caroline van Stockum-Haanebeek
To: Jo van Gogh-Bonger.
Date: The Hague, October 23, 1890

‘I did know that Vincent’s death had shocked him [Theo] terribly, but I and many in the family regarded it as a relief rather than a misfortune.
I knew the unhappy Vincent like that from an early age, and at home we had already gone through so much with him and had tried to make him more natural, but always without the least success.

Later, when he became even more peculiar and more difficult to get on with we always pitied your dear Theo, who with the greatest patience and the greatest possible devotion always supported his peculiar, searching brother so amicably and never doubted his talent and vocation as an artist. He endured a great deal from Vincent, and showed himself to the very end to be a faithful, loving, ministering friend and made every sacrifice for him. But alas, who would have thought that he would have to pay such a heavy price for all his care and devotion! How terrible that even now Vincent does not leave him in peace after his death and saddled him, as heir, with an impossible task to which he now, as it were, sacrifices all his life force and energy, such that his poor martyred head begins to suffer from it.’


"Even if you are a minority of one, The truth is the truth."
―Mahatma Gandhi

"The soul never thinks without a picture."
―Aristotle



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"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
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PATRICIA 22



Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
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MessaggioInviato: Mar Set 05, 2017 23:38    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, here is a letter that Dutch Artist, Arnold Hendrik Koning, wrote to Dutch Artist Critic, Albert Plasschaert, in which he describes some of his memories dealing with Theo and Vincent.

From: Arnold Hendrik Koning
To: Albert Plasschaert.
Date: Voorthuizen, May 8, 1912

'Having arrived in Paris in September 1887, I knew his brother Theodoor there first through the art dealers Goupil, and he soon put me in touch with Vincent, who – having just emerged from his Brabant interiors – was working hard to familiarize himself with his new way of seeing things. Theodoor and he lived in a spacious upstairs apartment with many rooms, very high up on Montmartre, in rue des Abbesses I believe, and there Vincent found a superb location for him to work. However, I couldn’t reconcile myself at all with what he was making, the shock at first glance had been too great, and it remained a mystery to me that he exchanged the method he had pursued in Brabant for it. You are familiar with his way of working from that period, so I will restrict myself to what I remember of our daily life, and can add here right away that that autumn, winter and spring with him was a very relaxing period for me.

I rented half of the upstairs apartment from Theodoor, who went to live closer to his business, and gradually began to penetrate Vincent’s realm of thought. He never stopped talking about his work and his ideas on color, about which I will send you a couple of letters from that period for your perusal. I had some more, but they have disappeared as a result of numerous moves. We had the beautiful things close at hand. Montmartre was still an El Dorado then, and Vincent was always sitting out there somewhere in the sun, with his work and his pipe, at the brickyard, or painting a woman in a vegetable stall, with all the reflections in purple, blue and orange which the sunny environment conjured up in it. I had promised Theo to keep an eye on the material side, and when I had finally persuaded him to come out for a meal, I saw another side of him, because then he did drop everything right away.

We then had to walk for 20 minutes to an eating-house, a kind of hall with a big glass roof like the central station, where it was good and cheap, and the walls were extremely suitable for exhibiting. The boss was an enterprising fellow but very quick-tempered, the doctor had said that he always had to count to 20 if he got angry. That did him a lot of good then, but even more so the interest our exhibitions aroused. It even attracted an art dealer, a red-haired Scotsman by the name of Alexander Reid. He never bought anything though, but the three of us always ate together. The restaurant had waitresses, about 30 of them, whom Vincent had given odd names in Dutch, which they couldn’t pronounce.

There was a giantess among them, very white and fat, as if she was made of margarine. Vincent always called her “the invertebrate”. When we laughed about it, Reid, the art dealer, thought it applied to him, and didn’t want to eat with us any longer. I met him once again later on, constantly disparaging Vincent. About a colored goat at a colourman’s he said “Look at that, a painting by Vincent”. A dog answering nature’s call: “Look at that, Vincent’s colors”. So that I said to him that he was probably sorry that Vincent was not associating with him any more, whereupon he also turned his back on me for good.

Montmartre, our house and our restaurant meanwhile remained the 3 big points of attraction. I said that the boss was an enterprising fellow. A great power, Russia I think, suddenly needed lots of money which France had to lend to it. The bankers walked around with pinched faces and wrinkled with worry. Things needed livening up, and one day all the girls put on Russian costumes, with a big red cap. I can still recall Vincent’s delight, and so as to contribute something as well I painted a big snow-covered plain with exiles on their way to Siberia. The boss later thought that this was not so suitable, and preferred to have the Czar’s head on the front door instead.

In early spring the following year, the pull of the south became too strong for Vincent, and his brother also thought it better for him not to wait any longer, but to have his wish fulfilled. We often corresponded about art after that, and although Vincent and above all Theodoor had introduced me to many people, it was not the real thing any more, and I went home soon afterwards.’


"I think the truth is the hardest missile one can be pelted with."
―George Eliot

"The empty vessel makes the loudest sound."
―William Shakespeare

Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
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Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
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genziana



Registrato: 22/03/04 13:40
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MessaggioInviato: Mer Set 06, 2017 09:21    Oggetto: RAI MOVIE 06/09/2017 10:55 IL VOLTO DI UN'ALTRA di CORSICATO Rispondi citando





    mercoledì 6 settembre '17 RAI MOVIE canale 24

    Alessandro PREZIOSI interprete della commedia

    Il VOLTO DI UN'ALTRA di Pappi Corsicato, 10:55






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PATRICIA 22



Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
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MessaggioInviato: Gio Set 07, 2017 00:28    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, In this letter Jan Benjamin Kam (who was the son of the Reverend Jan Gerrit Kam (1833-1917), shares his memories of Vincent van Gogh.

From: Jan Benjamin Kam
To: Albert Plasschaert.
Date: Helmond, June 12, 1912

'I first met van Gogh probably just before Christmas 1880 at Roosendaal station, and we travelled to Etten together. He was coming from Belgium, I presume from Antwerp, where he had been working at the academy and had drawn stoves for a blacksmith. It is possible that this meeting took place just before Easter 1881. I then saw a drawing by him of miners going to the pit through the snow in the early morning, very primitively drawn, without knowledge of perspective, quite small but very expressive. I would recognize the drawing immediately if I saw it again.

In June 1881 I went to see Vincent once more. He was living with his parents in Etten at the time; he had a room there adjoining the house for a workroom, where he also slept. He was oddly dressed then, without a collar, and he made studies of trees or shrubs in pencil. He used to go out with a portfolio and a coarse plank on which he stretched the paper. He needed a hard surface because he preferred to work with an ordinary carpenter’s pencil – that broad, coarse pencil that carpenters use. Now and then I saw him holding it in his fist and working on the paper to the point of tearing it.

At that time he had several visits from van Rappard, who came from Belgium, and who had started on a study in oils in the heath near by. On one occasion the three of us set out in the early morning. I painted a study, while the other two made drawings. van Gogh was in very high spirits, and more cheerful than I ever saw him again. That summer I went out with him repeatedly, or looked him up in his workroom, where he copied studies by Bargue with tremendous zeal. I believe he intended to copy a series of 100 poses, and I presume he finished them all. He was reading Zola then, and studied a very simple French book on perspective.

At that time the two of us paid a visit to the collection of his uncle, Mr van Gogh at Princenhage, where he spoke warmly of a beautiful little painting by Bosboom, and about Maris, Mauve, and some Frenchmen, but above all about Millet. He was drawing sowers then, and went into small dwellings to draw the woman doing some domestic chore. He forced people to pose for him. They were afraid of him, and it was not pleasant to be with him. He then began to apply some simple colors to his drawings. He just gave a tiled floor that he had drawn a red tint using watercolor. He also used pens then, cut from reeds, with Indian ink to which he later added uniform tints with water, a method that my brother and I imitated.

I do not remember any particular drawings from that period. I think I saw one of them later, at Oldenzeel’s in Rotterdam, I believe. He then left Etten in the autumn. I believe he went to Dordrecht and later to The Hague. I saw him for the last time the following year, 1882. I looked him up in his house in Schenkweg. I found him there in a room with buckets of dirty water in which he continually sponged his studies. His model was an emaciated poor lady whom he sketched again and again. He was extremely happy that a couple of city views of The Hague that he had drawn were being exhibited at Goupil’s. I think he made six of them, which were all bought, probably at the request of his brother Theo. I never saw Vincent again after that.’


"Truth never damages a cause that is just."
―Mahatma Gandhi

"Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something."
―Plato


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
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"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
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PATRICIA 22



Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
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MessaggioInviato: Ven Set 08, 2017 00:01    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, Here is Kerssemakers’s recollection of van Gogh’s studio in Nuenen.
Anton Kerssemakers (1846- 1924) was a tanner in Eindhoven and pupil of van Gogh. Johan Briedé (1885-1980) was a Dutch grafic designer. Kerssemakers included pictures with this letter.


From: Anton Kerssemakers
To: Johan Briedé.
Date: Eindhoven, June 23, 1914.

‘The cupboards were neither old nor antique, in fact he owned nothing of value. Everything bespoke a lack of money but he put everything to good use, made many objects himself or had them made by an ordinary carpenter working to his instructions, such as an easel, paint-boxes, perspective frame, stool, everything! Only once did he order a small paint-box of lacquered tin from Schoenfeld of Düsseldorf, and he went to great trouble to get it.

Benches at working height, with studies and all sorts of things on them
Cupboards with birds’ nests, mosses, clogs, etc.
Stove with a pile of ashes around it
farm implements in every corner, etc. etc.

Everywhere on the floor and chairs drawings, studies, illustrations, mainly from The Graphic, in short a complete mess ... As you will see, his studio was in two parts, and he worked there, where he had the best light.’


"Make an island of yourself, make yourself your refuge; there is no other refuge.
Make truth your island, make truth your refuge; there is no other refuge."
―Buddha

"I love to go to the zoo. But not on Sunday. I don't like to see the people making fun of the animals, when it should be the other way around."
―Ernest Hemingway


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
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Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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PATRICIA 22



Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Set 09, 2017 01:03    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, Here's a note written by Anna Cornelia van Gogh-Carbentus, (Vincent's mother) March 20, 1852. She is awaiting the birth of her first child, Vincent van Gogh, No, not the artist, his brother who was stillborn on March 30. There is no other mention of this child in the entire family archive. "Mother Carbentus" is Anna Cornelia Carbentus-Van der Gaag (1792-1855) mother of Anna van Gogh-Carbentus, grandmother of Vincent.


'We spent three pleasant weeks with Mother Carbentus, who in that time enabled us to prepare for the impending arrival of a small member of the household for which God had given us hope. Returning to our own home another pleasure awaited us. Equipped for the winter we pass many an evening full of pleasure, each going about our work, and were happy above all too in the thought of the increase of our domestic blessings ... and now we await the arrival of our little child together, and now I put down my pen, and may my Friend, as we hope, write about the birth of our little child.’


This brother who may have had an even bigger influence on van Gogh passed away a year before the artist was even born. Vincent Willem van Gogh was born and died on March 30, 1852—a stillbirth. Exactly a year later to the day, Vincent Willem van Gogh, future artist, was born. His grieving parents gave him the exact same name as his deceased brother. To make matters even more confusing, the church register assigned the surviving Vincent van Gogh the same number as the deceased Vincent van Gogh: 29.

At the time, it wasn’t uncommon for parents to name a surviving child after one that had died, but that doesn’t mean the practice wasn’t traumatic for child #2. It may have been particularly difficult in this situation, since the surviving Vincent van Gogh was aware of and presumably visited a gravestone with his full name and date of birth on it, off by just one year.

To cloud matters even more, Theo and his wife had a baby boy on January 31, 1890. They, too, named him Vincent Willem van Gogh. It was just six months later that van Gogh the artist "allegedly" killed himself. Some speculate that van Gogh, who was supposed to feel honored, instead felt that his brother was replacing him the way their parents had replaced their first child. This, some theorize, fueled a stage of depression that ultimately ended in an "alleged" suicide.

Remember, no one knows for sure whether Vincent van Gogh took his own life or someone else did. There is no proof. It's all hearsay. But we are beginning to get a pretty good idea of what was the cause of some his psychological problems.



"Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters."
―Albert Einstein

"He who learns but does not think, is lost! He who thinks but does not learn is in great danger."
―Confucius



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"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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PATRICIA 22



Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Set 09, 2017 22:58    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, Here is a Letter from Anna van Gogh (Vincent's sister) to Theo van Gogh, that was written in English. It contains some phrases in Dutch from a letter by Vincent to Anna, that must have been written on or about Friday, January 2, 1874. Anna thinks there may be more than a brother's love between Vincent and Ursula and she wants Theo's opinion.

From: Anna van Gogh
To: Theo van Gogh
Date: Leeuwarden, Tuesday, January 6, 1874

‘Monday morning at breakfast I found a letter from London, which contained a letter from Vincent and one from Ursula Loyer, both were very kind and amiable. She asks me to write her and Vincent wished very much we should be friends. I’ll tell what he writes about her. “Ursula Loyer is a girl with whom I have agreed that we’ll be each other’s brother and sister. You must also look on her as a sister and write to her, and I think that you will then soon discover what she is. I say no more than that I have never seen or dreamt of anything like the love between her and her mother.”

Then there follows a discription of Christmas and New-year and then still the following phrase. “Old girl, you mustn’t think that there’s anything more behind it than what I have written to you. But don’t say anything about it at home, I must do that myself. Just this again, love that girl for my sake.” I suppose there will be a love between those two, as between Agnes and David Copperfield. Although I must say, that I believe there is more than a brother’s love between them; I send you here Ursula’s letter so you can judge for yourself.’


"All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."
―Arthur Schopenhauer

"Be thou the rainbow in the storms of life. The evening beam that smiles the clouds away, and tints tomorrow with prophetic ray."
―Lord Byron



Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.

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Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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PATRICIA 22



Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
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MessaggioInviato: Dom Set 10, 2017 22:22    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, in this letter, Paul Gauguin, (who I believe was the guy who really sliced off Vincent's earlobe) whines about his problems to Vincent.

From: Paul Gauguin
To: Vincent van Gogh
Date: Le Pouldu, on or about Friday, January 17, 1890

My dear Vincent
Life is very long and very sad. Since your last letter I’ve been so deep in the doldrums that I couldn’t write, in the daytime wishing to see the evening, and at night awaiting the morning. Once the land is ploughed, the man casts the seed, and each day defending himself against the vagaries of the bad weather he manages to harvest. But what of us poor artists? Where does the seed we plant go, and when does the harvest come? In the 3 months I’ve been at Le Pouldu I’ve had 30 francs in my pocket; it’s obviously pointless my putting energy into it, I can’t carry on painting. Apart from these money troubles I’ve had other causes for sorrow. I almost lost one of my children, who fell from the 3rd floor into the street.

(Note: On or about December 16, Gauguin wrote to Theo about the accident that his eight-year-old son Jean-René had had in Copenhagen: ‘One of my boys fell from the 3rd floor. He was picked up in a terrible state and at the moment he’s in the hospital, more or less out of danger.’)

You will understand that in Copenhagen the household was overwhelmed, and that the expenses occasioned by this accident are throwing things into chaos (chaos which I’m powerless to remedy at the moment). All of this makes me sick with spleen, and I dare neither paint nor write. And why paint?

I very much like the 2 drawings you sent me, especially the one of the women who are picking olives. I’m pleased that you’ve exhibited in Brussels; have you any news of this exhibition. Let me know. Like us you have winter at the moment, and I know that for you it’s a harsh time to get through. You’re probably awaiting the heat with impatience so that you can work out of doors. I’m doing everything I can at the moment to leave for Tonkin at government expense,

(Note: In January 1890 Gauguin wrote from Pont-Aven to French artist, Claude Emile Schuffenecker, (1851-1934), saying that in Paris he hoped to arrange a position as a painter in Tonkin. ‘And if I don’t succeed with Tonkin I’ll try to work at something other than painting, because I have to heave to for a time. Or otherwise, I’ll press the finance minister to give me something or other in France’. Nothing ever came of his plan.)

but it isn’t easy, especially because I’m an artist and people don’t believe that they have any capacity for business. In the colonies there’s something for us westerners to do, and I hope to learn something new there in art at the same time as being relieved of financial worries for a time.

De Haan is still working here with me and making serious progress, but doesn’t want to return to Holland until he feels strong enough to silence his compatriots; they’re going to say harsh words to him about his transformation. These new questions of color had greatly tormented him, but today, when he’s beginning to see clearly in this new way, he’s full of ardour.

Excuse my delay in writing, and believe me always
Ever yours cordially,
Paul Gauguin


"Truth is the beginning of every good to the gods, and of every good to man."
―Plato

"Power is like being a lady... if you have to tell people you are, you aren't."
―Margaret Thatcher

Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.

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"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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genziana



Registrato: 22/03/04 13:40
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MessaggioInviato: Lun Set 11, 2017 02:09    Oggetto: RAI PREMIUM 11/09/17 23:00, TANGO PER LA LIBERTA' di NEGRIN Rispondi citando



RAI PREMIUM can.25 23:00 lunedì 11 settembre '17

ALESSANDRO PREZIOSI è protagonista del tv movie

" TANGO PER LA LIBERTA’ " - regia di Alberto Negrin












*HD www.raiplay.it/video/2016/06/TANGO-PER-LA-LIBERTA---STAGIONE-1---EPISODIO-1-514bf732-9696-4b5d-9493-c62cbf32f8a9.html


RAI.TV e backstage http://www.rai.tv/dl/RaiTV/programmi/page/Page-9bb7e8a6-dcb5-4fb2-bb2c-3a98ab01eb72.html




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