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MessaggioInviato: Lun Set 11, 2017 02:12    Oggetto: Keep On Shining LAMPOON - TIFFANY E CO. - VENEZIA 02/09/2017 Rispondi citando




ALESSANDRO PREZIOSI ha presenziato al "Keep On

Shining" LAMPOON Party
- presso il Conservatorio di

Musica Benedetto Marcello di VENEZIA - 02.09.2017









Keep On Shining oggi è un nuovo manifesto, completamente e unicamente destinato al talento – e alla curiosità che alimenta ogni talento. Un grande plauso va ancora una volta a Raffaella Banchero, amministratore delegato di Tiffany & Co. in Italia e in Spagna. Con coraggio e lungimiranza, questa signora meravigliosa sostiene tutti i progetti dove si illumina il talento – che sia quello di un artista visuale, di uno scrittore, di un musicista. ( video 02/09/2017 http://LAMPOON.IT/kos-17/keeponshining-thevenicewaltz/ )
Il sostegno al Conservatorio di Venezia, sia economico sia mediatico, ospitando lì un grande ballo titolato The Venice Walz è stata la volta di chiusa di un progetto editoriale. Durante il mese di luglio, insieme al fotografo Michael Avedon e con la nostra direzione artistica, abbiamo cercato coloro che potessero rappresentare una scena musicale italiana inedita: artisti e produttori, maestranze, giovani talenti proiettati a una scrittura internazionale. È stato difficile far comprendere il valore a agenti e uffici stampa, ma siamo felici perché i migliori sono quelli che sanno vedere un passo oltre.
La musica è la più bella espressione dell’animo umano, scrisse Fryderyk Chopin. Chiunque fa musica è un eroe oggi – e per
THE FASHIONABLE LAMPOON sostenere la musica, in ogni sua forma, è una priorità. Vogliamo ritrovare la poesia, nella musica, oltre al ritmo – vogliamo ritrovare i romanzi, nella musica – rallentare il tempo, e salvarlo con la bellezza – un po’ come si salva il mondo (davvero, oltre alla bellezza, non abbiamo armi, per il mondo).
La scena musicale italiana – lo hanno ripetuto tutti, qui e altrove – è in difficoltà. La musica italiana, così come la letteratura italiana, resta chiusa dentro i confini che la bloccano in una dimensione di provincia. Perché se la bellezza salverà il mondo, c’è solo un’energia che salverà gli uomini e annienterà l’ignoranza: questa energia è quella immensa, gigantesca voglia che ci attanaglia la mente e che si chiama curiosità. ( comunicato originale del 21/08/2017: http://LAMPOON.IT/magazine/keep-on-shining-2017/ )






L’attore Alessandro Preziosi indossa l'orologio TIFFANI & Co. - 2 settembre 2017. Courtesy of Grazia Lotti Relazioni Pubbliche




con Raffaella Banchero, amministratore delegato di Tiffany & Co. in Italia e in Spagna. Courtesy of Grazia Lotti Relazioni Pubbliche

2 e 3 pubblicate da LuxGallery.it tra quelle selezionate quali migliori look della 5ª giornata della Mostra del Cinema di Venezia 74


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MessaggioInviato: Lun Set 11, 2017 23:32    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, in this letter, Paul "the earlobe slasher" Gauguin, poses a question to Vincent: "Do you not fear that I may also be a similar cause of the memories that disturb you when you go to Arles?" Ha! Ya think? Laughing

From: Paul Gauguin
To: Vincent van Gogh
Date: Le Pouldu, Wednesday, 22 or Thursday, January 23, 1890

My dear Vincent
Thanks for your letter and for your projected proposals, they gave me a lot to think about, and I admit that I consider life together possible, very possible, but with many precautions. Your state of ill-health, which isn’t yet completely cured, requires calm and a lot of careful handling. You say yourself that memories disturb you when you go to Arles. Do you not fear that I may also be a similar cause? In any event, it wouldn’t seem prudent to me to start out in a town where you’d find yourself isolated and consequently lack immediate care should you relapse – so I’m looking for the most propitious place.

We’ve chatted about this with De Haan (a completely serious man), and I consider that Antwerp would completely fit the bill. Because life is as cheap as in some provincial hole. Next, because there are museums which aren’t to be sneered at for painters. Then one can work for sale there. Why shouldn’t we found a studio in my name; with a few connections, with our names a little known through the Vingtistes it would be possible, and however little one does one is still making a profitable step.

(Note: In 1889 Gauguin had shown twelve works at the exhibition of Les Vingt. In 1890 van Gogh exhibited six paintings.)

In my opinion, Impressionism won’t really find its place in France until it’s back from abroad. It’s there where one reasons about it best and gives it the warmest welcome, so it’s there that one must work. You will be two Dutchmen, that’s to say from the country, although Antwerp is Belgian. There’s been an exhibition of mine in Copenhagen recently with works that were previously refused, as I told you.

(Note: Gauguin is referring to the exhibition of French and Scandinavian Impressionists, held by the Kunstforeningen (The Society of the Friends of Art) in Copenhagen from October 31 to November 11, 1889. Several of Gauguin’s early works were on display, as well as paintings by Manet, Degas, Cézanne, Pissarro, Sisley and Guillaumin from Gauguin’s collection, which he had left with his wife in Copenhagen. The works that had been ‘refused’ is a reference to a small exhibition of Gauguin’s work held at the beginning of May 1885 at the Kunstforeningen. According to Gauguin, the exhibition was closed after five days by order of the Academy, and the press was forbidden to write about it. Exactly what happened is, however, unclear.)

Well it was very successful. It’s an indication that the 1st work I did was bearing fruit after germinating slowly. In the same way in Antwerp, by bestirring ourselves, 3 talented fellows, firm in their beliefs, we’ll take a step forward. And a little later, if it works out a bit, why not make a small branch of your brother’s in terms of selling. Your brother could lend you a few canvases by other artists, and with this drop of water hollow out the rock.

(Note: This is derived from a Latin saying handed down in many variants, of which the best known is ‘Gutta cavat lapidem, non vi, sed sepe cadendo’.)

There you have it, my dear Vincent, broadly speaking my opinion on your project. Answer me with your frank opinion about it. In any event, all of this is very cloudy, since I’m pursuing my Tonkin project vigorously. At the moment we have spring tide storms that are keeping us in the studio, and it’s very sad.

Best wishes.
Ever yours,
P. Gauguin

Regards from De Haan.


"Plato is my friend; Aristotle is my friend, but my greatest friend is truth."
―Isaac Newton

"Life is hard; it's harder if you're stupid."
―John Wayne

Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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MessaggioInviato: Mer Set 13, 2017 00:51    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, in this letter, Gauguin tells Vincent that, "the winter is always dangerous to you." Lol! The winter wasn't the only thing that was dangerous to him. Wink "Pauly" also insults French painter Armand Guillaumin, claiming, "he only sees material things, with a brainless eye." Yikes! Guillaumin made Gauguin angry! He was lucky that he got away with his ear still intact. Laughing

From: Paul Gauguin
To: Vincent van Gogh
Date: Paris, on or about Thursday, March 20, 1890

My dear Vincent
I’ve looked most attentively at your works since we parted; first at your brother’s place and at the Independents’ exhibition.

(Note: Gauguin had visited Theo at home on March 13.)

It’s above all at this latter place that one can properly judge what you do, either because of things positioned beside each other, or because of the neighbouring works. I offer you my sincere compliments, and for many artists you are the most remarkable in the exhibition. With things from nature you’re the only one there who thinks.

I’ve talked about it with your brother, and there’s one that I would like to exchange with you for a thing of your choice. The one I’m talking about is a mountain landscape. Two tiny travellers seem to be climbing up there in search of the unknown. It contains an emotion à la Delacroix, with a very evocative color. Here and there red notes like lights, the whole in a violet note. It’s beautiful and imposing.

(Note: Gauguin's letter sketch was made after van Gogh’s Ravine, which was on display at the exhibition.)

I’ve talked at length about it with Aurier, Bernard and many others. All send you their compliments. Only Guillaumin shrugs his shoulders when he hears of it. Besides, I understand him, given that he only sees material things, with a brainless eye. He’s the same when it comes to my painting over these last few years, and understands nothing of it.

I hesitated greatly to write to you, knowing that you had just had a rather long crisis, so please don’t reply to me until you feel completely strong. Let’s hope that with the warm weather that will return you’re going to get well at last, the winter is always dangerous to you.

Cordially yours,
Paul Gauguin


"What is against truth cannot be just"
― Saint Augustine

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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MessaggioInviato: Mer Set 13, 2017 23:59    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, in this letter, Gauguin is now insulting the people where he lives, he states, "Of course, the collection of boors around here think I’m completely mad and I’m happy about that, because it proves to me that I’m not." Ha! Laughing Gauguin was hilarious! I had no idea "Pauly" was so entertaining! Other than his penchant for ear cutting, it sounds like he would of been a riot to hang out with.

From: Paul Gauguin
To: Vincent van Gogh
Date: Pont-Aven, on or about Sunday, July 22, 1888

My dear Vincent
I’ve just read your interesting letter and I entirely agree with you on the slight importance that accuracy contributes to art. Art is an abstraction; unfortunately we’re becoming increasingly misunderstood. I would very much like it if we were to achieve our aims, that is, my coming to Provence. I’ve always had an itch to interpret bullfights in my own way, as I understand them. I’m beginning to recover the full use of my faculties: my illness had weakened me, and in my most recent studies I have, I think, gone beyond what I’ve been doing up to now.

Of course, the collection of boors around here think I’m completely mad and I’m happy about that, because it proves to me that I’m not. I’ve just finished a Breton wrestling that I’m sure you’ll like. Two kids, one pair of blue trunks and one pair of vermilion. One at top right, coming up out of the water. A green lawn – pure Veronese shading off into chrome yellow with no execution, like Japanese prints. At the top a cascade of foaming water, white pink, and a rainbow on the edge near the frame. At the bottom a white patch, a black hat and blue smock.

(Note: Gauguin is referring to The young wrestlers, 1888. A letter from Gauguin to Schuffenecker of July 8, 1888 also contains a sketch and description of this painting.)

Talking of Russell, Granchi told me he’d seen him 2 months ago in Paris, and that Russell had great admiration for me and that he was to go to Belle-Île. I don’t quite understand why a rich man doesn’t buy what he admires. Anyway, let’s hope.

(Note: Gauguin had got to know Achille Granchi-Taylor in Paris in 1885. Both artists were in Pont-Aven in 1886 and 1888. Granchi-Taylor had worked at Cormon’s studio; this is probably how he knew Russell.)

So who is this Thomas you speak of, is it Thomas de Bojano? Unless it’s the dealer who used to be near place Vendôme.

(Note: van Gogh must have written to Gauguin about the art dealer Georges Thomas. Louis Nicolas André Thomas, Duke of Bojano, was the managing director of the Compagnie du Soleil insurance company and a collector. His collection of 118 works was sold at auction in 1882. By the dealer near Place Vendôme, Gauguin probably meant the paint supplier and art dealer Jean Joseph Thomas, who had a shop at 235 rue Saint-Honoré until 1887.)

My friend Laval is back from Martinique; he brought some very curious watercolors. I’ll have you look at some that you’ll like, they’re art. I’m talking as if we were already together. I have to tell you that once I’ve taken a decision I’m always in haste to carry it out.

If it weren’t for this damned money, my bags would soon be packed. I don’t know why, but for the past ten days or so I have lots of painted follies in my head which I plan to execute in the south: I think it has to do with my state of health, which is blooming again. It’s as if I have a need to struggle, to hack away with crushing blows — after all the research I’ve done here I think I can easily forge ahead.

Until we’re together, an affectionate handshake.
Paul Gauguin


"False words are not only evil in themselves, but they infect the soul with evil."
―Socrates

"No legacy is so rich as honesty."
―William Shakespeare


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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MessaggioInviato: Gio Set 14, 2017 23:41    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, in this letter, Gauguin tells Vincent that he agrees with his wish for painting with a coloration suggesting poetic ideas, but with one difference. He doesn't know any poetic ideas. Ha! nevertheless, Gauguin finds everything poetic. And you know he means it, because he wrote the French word "TOUT" (Je trouve TOUT poetique) which translates into "EVERYTHING" in English, (I find EVERYTHING poetic), in capital letters. Laughing

From: Paul Gauguin
To: Vincent van Gogh
Date: Pont-Aven, on or about Saturday, September 8, 1888

My dear Vincent
I received your letter the very moment I was about to write to you. Excuse me if I write so infrequently and so briefly. I’m terribly bored and I’m suffering from stomach trouble; we have rain constantly. I work and I do nothing, in the sense that I draw with hand, head and heart, with a view to what I wish to do later. Yes, you’re right to wish for painting with a coloration suggesting poetic ideas, and in that sense I’m in agreement with you, with one difference. I don’t know any poetic ideas, it’s probably a sense that I lack.

I find EVERYTHING poetic, and it’s in the corners of my heart which are sometimes mysterious that I catch a glimpse of poetry. Forms and colors brought into harmonies create a form of poetry in themselves. Without allowing myself to be surprised by the subject, when looking at a painting by someone else, I feel a sensation that leads me into a poetic state depending on whether the painter’s intellectual powers emanate from it. There’s no point quibbling about it; we’ll talk about it at length. In that respect, I’m very despondent at being detained at Pont-Aven; my debt is increasing every day, and making my journey more and more unlikely.

The artist’s life is one long Calvary to go through! And that’s perhaps what makes us live. Passion enlivens us, and we die when it has nothing more to feed on. Let’s leave these paths full of thorny bushes, but they have their wild poetry all the same.
I’m studying young Bernard, whom I don’t know as well as you do; I believe you’ll do him good, and he needs it.

(Note: Emile Bernard had been in Pont-Aven for a month.)

He has suffered, of course, and he’s starting out in life full of bile, ready to see man’s bad side. I hope that with his intelligence and his love of art he’ll see one day that goodness is a force against others, and a consolation for our own ills. He likes you and respects you, so you can have a good influence on him. We need to be very united in heart and in intellect if we wish the future to put us in our true place.
Is your brother travelling? I have no more news from him.

Cordially yours,
Paul Gauguin


"False face must hide what the false heart doth know."
―William Shakespeare

"Experience is the teacher of all things."
―Julius Caesar

Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Set 16, 2017 00:25    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, I can see why Vincent liked Gauguin so much. They were alike! They had the same painting style. They were both constantly complaining about their sickly state and stomach problems. Something always weighed on them horribly, and they were always waiting for better times. To say these 2 weren't exactly the life of the party, is an understatement! Laughing

Other things they had in common: it wasn't until after their death that their art began receiving great acclaim and they both had an alcohol problem. Alcohol is sure to have played a role in van Gogh’s unpredictable behavior as well as his hallucinations and delusions. Gauguin also referred to himself as a savage, and claimed to have Inca blood. Ha! Not sure if that was the alcohol talking. Laughing "Pauly" was quite a colorful character.


From: Paul Gauguin
To: Vincent van Gogh
Date: Pont-Aven, on or about Wednesday, September 26, 1888

My dear Vincent
I’m very late in replying to you; but what can I say, my sickly state and my worries often leave me in a state of prostration, in which I sink into inaction.

(Note: Vincent had written to Gauguin shortly before September 11, as emerges from a previous letter to Theo.)

If you were familiar with my life you would understand that after having struggled so much (in every way) I’m in the process of drawing breath, and at the moment I’m lying dormant. Your idea for an exchange, to which I haven’t yet replied, appeals to me, and I’ll do the portrait you want, but not yet. I’m not in a fit state to do it, seeing that it’s not a copy of a face that you want, but a portrait as I understand it. I’m studying young Bernard, and I don’t have him yet. I shall perhaps do it from memory, but in any case it will be an abstraction. Perhaps tomorrow, I don’t know, it will come to me all at once. At the moment there’s a spell of fine weather which is leading us both to try lots of things.

I’ve just done a religious painting, very badly done, but which was interesting to do, and which I like. I wanted to give it to the church at Pont-Aven. They don’t want it, of course.

Breton women, grouped together, are praying; costumes very intense black. The yellow-white bonnets very luminous. The two bonnets on the right are like monstrous helmets. An apple tree goes across the canvas: dark purple, and the foliage drawn in masses like emerald green clouds, with yellow-green interstices of sunlight. The earth (pure vermilion). At the church it goes down and becomes red brown.

The angel is dressed in violent ultramarine blue, and Jacob in bottle green. The angel’s wings pure no. 1 chrome yellow. The angel’s hair no. 2 chrome, and the feet flesh-orange.

(Note: Paul Gauguin, The vision after the sermon, 1888. In 1904 Bernard recounted how Gauguin had offered the painting to the priest of the church in Névez, a village not far from Pont-Aven: ‘Then the priest asked about the subject matter and declared it to be non-religious. If only it clearly portrayed the famous struggle! but those enormous bonnets and peasants’ backs filling the canvas, and the principal subject being reduced, in the distance, to such insignificant proportions!! ...That was not possible, he would be reprimanded...’)

I believe I’ve achieved a great rustic and superstitious simplicity in the figures. The whole very severe. The cow under the tree is tiny by comparison with reality, and is prancing. For me, the landscape and the wrestling exist only in the imagination of the people at prayer after the sermon; that’s why there’s a contrast between the real people and the wrestling in its landscape, not real and out of proportion.

In your letter you seem angry at our laziness about the portrait, and that pains me; friends don’t get angry with each other (at a distance, words cannot be interpreted at their true value).

(Note: As far as we know, van Gogh had not written to Gauguin since about September 11. Gauguin must be referring here to van Gogh’s letter to Bernard, written between Wednesday, 19 and Tuesday, September 25, in which he reacted to the latter’s refusal to paint Gauguin’s portrait.)

Another thing. You turn the dagger in the wound when you do all you can to prove to me that I must come to the south, given that I’m suffering on account of not being there at this moment. When you suggested that I go there as part of your partnership I categorically wrote you a last letter in the affirmative, happy at your brother’s offer. There’s no question for me of creating a studio in the north, since every day I hope for a sale that will allow me to leave here. The people who are feeding me here, the doctor who treated me, did it on credit and wouldn’t hold back a single painting, a single piece of clothing, and are faultless towards me — I can’t leave them without committing a bad deed that would trouble me enormously. If they were either rich or thieves, it would mean nothing to me. So I shall wait. On the other hand, if when the day came you were otherwise disposed, and you had to say to me, Too late..... I’d prefer that you did it right away. I’m fearful that your brother, who likes my talent, rates it too highly. If he found a collector or speculator who was tempted by low prices, let him do it.

(Note: van Gogh took a contrary view, as we can also see from a crossed-out scrap of writing on the back of a sketch that he enclosed with a letter to Eugène Boch. the words were addressed to Gauguin.)

I’m a man of sacrifices, and I’d like him to understand that whatever he does, I’ll find it well done. Young Bernard will shortly be taking several canvases of mine to Paris.

Laval expects to come and find me in the south towards the month of February. He’s found someone who’ll pay him 150 francs a month for a year.
It appears to me now, my dear Vincent, that you’re getting your sums wrong.

(Note: van Gogh had written to Bernard about the cost of living in Arles in a previous letter.)

I know the prices in the south; aside from the restaurant, I undertake to keep the household going on 200 francs a month, with food for three. I have kept house, and I know how to get by. All the more so with four. As far as accommodation goes; apart from yours, Laval and Bernard could have a small furnished room nearby. I like the way you picture your dream house and its arrangement, and my mouth is watering to see it.

Ah well! As far as possible I don’t want to think any more about the promised fruit. Waiting for better times, unless I’m released from this lousy existence, which, aside from work, weighs on me so horribly.

Cordially yours,
P. Gauguin


"To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man."
―William Shakespeare

"I have the terrible feeling that, because I am wearing a white beard and am sitting in the back of the theatre, you expect me to tell you the truth about something. These are the cheap seats, not Mount Sinai."
―Orson Welles

"Prometheus heretofore went up to Heaven, and stole fire from thence. Have not I as much Boldness as he?"
―Cyrano de Bergerac


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Set 16, 2017 21:51    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, in this letter, Gauguin tells Vincent that he would have plenty to amuse himself, seeing all these painters here, pickled in their mediocrity like gherkins in vinegar. He says, "they’re still, and will always be, nitwit gherkins." Ha! He also questions whether it was "worth the trouble that Jesus died for all these lousy buffoons?" As an artist, he thinks yes; as a reformer, He doesn't believe so. Laughing Lastly, "Pauly" ends the letter with a rhyme that he wrote himself. Better grab the tissues Alessandro. It tugs at the heartstrings. Wink


From: Paul Gauguin
To: Vincent van Gogh
Date: Pont-Aven, Monday, October 1, 1888

My dear Vincent
We’ve satisfied your desire; in a different way, it’s true, but what does it matter, since the result is the same? Our 2 portraits.

(Note: Self-portrait with portrait of Gauguin, and Paul Gauguin, Self-portrait with portrait of Bernard. van Gogh received the portraits soon afterwards.)

Having no silver white, I used lead white, and it could well happen that the color becomes darker and heavier.

(Note: Lead white has a tendency to darken to black, particularly when it is left unvarnished in a film of oil.)

And besides, it’s not done exclusively from the point of view of color. I feel the need to explain what I was trying to do, not that you’re not capable of guessing by yourself, but because I don’t believe that I’ve achieved it in my work. The mask of a thief, badly dressed and powerful like Jean Valjean, who has his nobility and inner gentleness.

(Note: Gauguin titled his painting ‘les misérables’ and dedicated it ‘to my friend Vincent’ (à l’ami Vincent). He also described it in a letter to Schuffenecker of October 8, 1888. At the beginning of Victor Hugo’s Les misérables the central character, Jean Valjean, has just been released after serving a term of hard labour. Because of his shabby appearance he is viewed with suspicion and regarded as dangerous.

This rejection and exclusion reminds him of the injustice of his prison term and brings his hate to the surface. He turns against the church. Through contact with the bishop, who stands by him in his moral reform, his goodness gradually returns. The desire for vengeance gives way to compassion. Valjean has now become a father to everyone and assumes the care of Cosette, the little daughter of a prostitute.

Merlhès believes that Gauguin derived the inspiration for his self-portrait from Hugo’s descriptions of Jean Valjean’s appearance. The contrast of warm and cool colors in the painting reflects the ‘dualism of light and shade, of good and evil’ (dualisme de l’ombre et de la lumière, du bien et du mal) which defines Jean Valjean’s character and plays an important part in Hugo’s oeuvre.)

The rutting blood floods the face, and the tones of a fiery smithy, which surround the eyes, suggest the red-hot lava that sets our painters’ souls ablaze. The drawing of the eyes and the nose, like the flowers in Persian carpets, epitomizes an abstract and symbolic art. That girlish little background, with its childish flowers, is there to testify to our artistic virginity. And that Jean Valjean, whom society oppresses, outlawed; with his love, his strength, isn’t he too the image of an Impressionist today?

By doing him with my features, you have my individual image, as well as a portrait of us all, poor victims of society, taking our revenge on it by doing good — ah! my dear Vincent, you would have plenty to amuse you, seeing all these painters here, pickled in their mediocrity like gherkins in vinegar. Makes no difference whether they’re fat, long or twisted and warty, they’re still, and will always be, nitwit gherkins. Eugène, just look at him! Eugène, that’s Habert, Habert’s the one who killed Dupuis, you know...

(Note: On April 29, 1888 the painters Félix Dupuis and Eugène Habert fought a duel with pistols in the Bois de Boulogne in Paris, and Dupuis was killed. The incident, which sparked off a national debate about the legality of duelling, received wide coverage in the press. Habert was acquitted by the court in June.)

And his pretty wife and his old mother, and the whole bloody lot! And Eugène paints, writes for the newspapers, travels free in First class, sir. There’s enough there to make you laugh till you cry. Aside from his art, what a lousy existence, and was it worth the trouble that Jesus died for all these lousy buffoons? As an artist, yes; as a reformer, I don’t believe so.

(Note: It is quite conceivable that Gauguin is referring here to the discussions about Christ between van Gogh and Bernard. In another letter which Bernard had shown to Gauguin, van Gogh calls Christ ‘an artist greater than all artists’ (un artiste plus grand que tous les artistes).

Our pal Bernard is working and making plans to come to Arles too. Laval, whom you don’t know, but who knows you through your letters and our little bits of gossip, joins us in shaking your hand.

Yours,
Paul Gauguin

Burning sun who settest all ablaze
halt thy furious race }For a penny
without ado I wish } whistle
to paint thine orange face.

(Note: Changes to the verse were made in a different hand; the final version reads:
‘Burning sun who passest by
halt thy scurvy steed
without sleight-of-hand I’d
paint thy face O chrome two!’
(Soleil ardent qui passe
arrête ton coursier scabreux
je veux sans passe passe
peindre ta face Ô chrome deux!)


(Note: According to Cooper, Gauguin wrote the little rhyme himself, and he probably made the changes too.)


"There's no art to find the mind's construction in the face."
―William Shakespeare

"Truth is by nature self-evident. As soon as you remove the cobwebs of ignorance that surround it, it shines clear."
―Mahatma Gandhi


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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mayte



Registrato: 25/09/15 20:30
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MessaggioInviato: Sab Set 16, 2017 22:43    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


CARO ALE TI ASPETTIAMO!!!
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Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
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MessaggioInviato: Dom Set 17, 2017 19:39    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, this is Vincent's response to Gauguin's "excellent letter." Vincent talks about how he left Paris "very, very upset, quite ill and almost an alcoholic", (almost an alcoholic? Ha!), He also mentions Buddha, Greece, and the poets and artists of the Renaissance. Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio and the painters Giotto and Botticelli, and of course, everyone's favorite new poet — Paul Gauguin! Laughing


From: Vincent van Gogh
To: Paul Gauguin
Date: Arles, Wednesday, October 3, 1888

My dear Gauguin,
This morning, I received your excellent letter, which I’ve immediately sent to my brother; your conception of the Impressionist in general, of which your portrait is a symbol, is striking. I couldn’t be more intrigued to see it — but it will seem to me, I’m already sure, that this work is too important for me to wish to have it as an exchange.

But if you wish to keep it for us, my brother will buy it from you, as I immediately asked him, at the first opportunity if you wish, and let’s hope that will be very soon.
Because we’ll try once again to urge the possibility of your coming.
I must tell you that even while working I never cease to think about this enterprise of setting up a studio with yourself and me as permanent residents, but which we’d both wish to make into a shelter and a refuge for our pals at moments when they find themselves at an impasse in their struggle. When you left Paris, my brother and I spent more time there together that will always remain unforgettable to me.

(Note: Gauguin left Paris for Brittany on January 26.)

Our discussions took on a broader scope — with Guillaumin, with Pissarro, father and son, with Seurat, whom I didn’t know (I visited his studio just a few hours before my departure). In these discussions, it was often a matter of the thing that’s so dear to our hearts, both my brother’s and mine, the steps to be taken in order to preserve the means of production (colors, canvases), and to preserve directly to them their share in the price that their paintings at present fetch only when they have long ceased to be the property of the artists. When you’re here we’ll go back over all those discussions.

In any event, when I left Paris very, very upset, quite ill and almost an alcoholic through overdoing it, while my strength was abandoning me — then I withdrew into myself, and without daring to hope yet. At present, dimly on the horizon, here it comes to me nevertheless — hope —that intermittent hope that has sometimes consoled me in my lonely life. Now I’d like to see you taking a very large share in this belief that we’ll be relatively successful in founding something lasting.

When we’ll talk about those strange days of discussions in the poor studios and the cafés of the Petit Boulevard, and you’ll see in full our idea, my brother’s and mine, which hasn’t in any way been carried out, in terms of forming an association.

Nevertheless, you’ll see that it is such that everything that we’ll do in future to remedy the terrible state of these past few years will either be just what we said, or something similar to it. So unshakeable a basis will we have given the thing. And you’ll admit, when you have the full explanation, that we’ve gone well beyond the plan we’ve already told you about. It’s no more than our duty as picture dealers to have gone further, because you perhaps know that I too spent years in the trade, and I don’t look down on a profession in which I’ve eaten my daily bread.

Suffice it to say that I don’t believe that even when apparently cutting yourself off from Paris you will cease to feel that you’re in fairly direct contact with Paris.
I have an extraordinary fever for work these days, at present I’m grappling with a landscape with blue sky above an immense green, purple, yellow vine with black and orange shoots.

Little figures of ladies with red sunshades, little figures of grape-pickers with their cart further liven it up. Foreground of grey sand. Once again square no. 30 canvas for the decoration of the house.

I have a portrait of myself, all ash-colored. The ashy color that comes from mixing Veronese with orange lead, on a pale background of uniform Veronese, with a red-brown garment. But exaggerating my personality also, I looked more for the character of a bonze, a simple worshipper of the eternal Buddha.

(Note: van Gogh’s reference to ‘the character of a bonze, a simple worshipper of the eternal Buddha’ may have been prompted by Emile Burnouf’s article, ‘Le bouddhisme en Occident’, Revue des Deux Mondes 58 (July 15, 1888), van Gogh was in any event familiar with Henry Cochin’s article on Boccaccio (‘Boccace d’après ses oeuvres et les témoignages contemporains’) in the same issue. Merlhès regards Burnouf’s article as the direct source for the self-portrait; however the words van Gogh used do not occur in the article. Loti’s Madame Chrysanthème might also have inspired him to depict himself thus.)

It cost me a good deal of trouble, but I’ll have to do it all over again if I want to express the thing. I’ll have to cure myself even further of the conventional numbness of our so-called civilized state, in order to have a better model for a better painting.

Something that gave me enormous pleasure; I received a letter from Boch yesterday (his sister is one of the Belgian Vingtistes), who writes that he’s settled in the Borinage to paint miners and coal-mines there.

(Note: Boch’s sister Anna was a member of the artists’ association Les Vingt from 1886 to 1894.)

He’ll return, though, to what he has in mind in the south — to vary his impressions, and in that case will certainly come to Arles. I find my artistic ideas extremely commonplace in comparison with yours.

I always have an animal’s coarse appetites. I forget everything for the external beauty of things, which I’m unable to render because I make it ugly in my painting, and coarse, whereas nature seems perfect to me. Now, however, the energy of my bony carcass is such that it goes straight to the target; from that comes a perhaps sometimes original sincerity in what I make, if, that is, the subject lends itself to my rough and unskilful execution.

I believe that if from now on you began to think of yourself as the head of this studio, which we’ll attempt to make a refuge for several people, little by little, bit by bit, as our unremitting work provides us with the means to bring the thing to completion — I believe that then you’ll feel relatively consoled for your present misfortunes of penury and illness, considering that we’re probably giving our lives for a generation of painters that will survive for many years to come.
These parts of the world have already seen both the cult of Venus —essentially artistic in Greece — and the poets and artists of the Renaissance. Where these things have been able to flower, Impressionism can do so too.

(Note: It emerges from the following paragraph that van Gogh is referring to the poets Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio and the painters Giotto and Botticelli, whom he discussed in another letter after reading Cochin’s article ‘Boccace d’après ses oeuvres et les témoignages contemporains’.)

About the room where you’ll stay, I’ve made a decoration especially for it, the garden of a poet (in the croquis Bernard has there’s a first idea for it, later simplified).

(Note: At this point the decoration called ‘the poet’s garden’ consisted of The public garden (‘The poet’s garden’) and a now unknown painting of the park. van Gogh regarded the canvases as companion pieces and gave them the title of ‘the poet’s garden.' They were joined later by two more paintings: The public garden with a couple strolling and Row of cypresses with a couple strolling.
Bernard owned the drawing Newly mown lawn with a weeping tree which shows the same corner of the park.)

The unremarkable public garden contains plants and bushes that make one dream of landscapes in which one may readily picture to oneself Botticelli, Giotto, Petrarch, Dante and Boccaccio. In the decoration I’ve tried to tease out the essence of what constitutes the changeless character of the region.

(Note: Vincent had previously told Theo that he wanted to capture ‘the real character of things here’ in his views of the park.)

And I’d have wished to paint this garden in such a way that one would think both of the old poet of this place (or rather, of Avignon), Petrarch, and of its new poet — Paul Gauguin. However clumsy this effort, you’ll still see, perhaps, that while preparing your studio I’ve thought of you with very deep feeling. Let’s be of good heart for the success of our enterprise, and may you continue to feel very much at home here.

Because I’m so strongly inclined to believe that all this will last for a long time.
Good handshake, and believe me

Ever yours,
Vincent

Only I’m afraid that you’ll find Brittany more beautiful — even though you may well see nothing more beautiful than things out of Daumier, figures here are often pure Daumier. Now, as for you, it won’t take you long to discover, under all the modernity, the ancient world and the Renaissance, which is sleeping. Now, as far as they’re concerned, you’re at liberty to reawaken them.

Bernard tells me that he, Moret, Laval and someone else would do an exchange with me. I am really, in principle, a great supporter of the system of exchanges among artists, since I see that it occupied a considerable place in the life of the Japanese painters. So one of these days I’ll send you such studies as I have to spare, in the dry state, and you’ll have first choice.

(Note: In his influential book L’Art japonais (1883) Louis Gonse wrote about Japanese artists’ custom of exchanging prints known as ‘surimonos’: ‘Small sheets, drawn or engraved by members of societies of artists, poets and tea-drinkers, are called surimonos ... At New Year, the members of these societies were normally in the habit of giving each other presents. It was also good manners to make a drawing for the occasion, which one would have engraved and of which one would print a limited number of proofs for selection. In the hands of members, these proofs, called surimonos, perpetuated the memory of their periodic meetings.)

But I won’t exchange a single one with you if on your part it would mean costing you something as significant as your portrait, which would be too beautiful. For sure, I wouldn’t dare, because my brother will gladly buy it from you against a whole month’s allowance.


"The empty vessel makes the loudest sound."
―William Shakespeare

"You cannot change the truth, but the truth can change you."
―Buddha


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.
_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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mayte



Registrato: 25/09/15 20:30
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MessaggioInviato: Dom Set 17, 2017 19:51    Oggetto: Re: Keep On Shining LAMPOON - TIFFANY E CO. - VENEZIA 02/09/ Rispondi citando


Può aversi più classe ed essere più elegante?



genziana ha scritto:


ALESSANDRO PREZIOSI ha presenziato al "Keep On

Shining" LAMPOON Party
- presso il Conservatorio di

Musica Benedetto Marcello di VENEZIA - 02.09.2017









Keep On Shining oggi è un nuovo manifesto, completamente e unicamente destinato al talento – e alla curiosità che alimenta ogni talento. Un grande plauso va ancora una volta a Raffaella Banchero, amministratore delegato di Tiffany & Co. in Italia e in Spagna. Con coraggio e lungimiranza, questa signora meravigliosa sostiene tutti i progetti dove si illumina il talento – che sia quello di un artista visuale, di uno scrittore, di un musicista. ( video 02/09/2017 http://LAMPOON.IT/kos-17/keeponshining-thevenicewaltz/ )
Il sostegno al Conservatorio di Venezia, sia economico sia mediatico, ospitando lì un grande ballo titolato The Venice Walz è stata la volta di chiusa di un progetto editoriale. Durante il mese di luglio, insieme al fotografo Michael Avedon e con la nostra direzione artistica, abbiamo cercato coloro che potessero rappresentare una scena musicale italiana inedita: artisti e produttori, maestranze, giovani talenti proiettati a una scrittura internazionale. È stato difficile far comprendere il valore a agenti e uffici stampa, ma siamo felici perché i migliori sono quelli che sanno vedere un passo oltre.
La musica è la più bella espressione dell’animo umano, scrisse Fryderyk Chopin. Chiunque fa musica è un eroe oggi – e per
THE FASHIONABLE LAMPOON sostenere la musica, in ogni sua forma, è una priorità. Vogliamo ritrovare la poesia, nella musica, oltre al ritmo – vogliamo ritrovare i romanzi, nella musica – rallentare il tempo, e salvarlo con la bellezza – un po’ come si salva il mondo (davvero, oltre alla bellezza, non abbiamo armi, per il mondo).
La scena musicale italiana – lo hanno ripetuto tutti, qui e altrove – è in difficoltà. La musica italiana, così come la letteratura italiana, resta chiusa dentro i confini che la bloccano in una dimensione di provincia. Perché se la bellezza salverà il mondo, c’è solo un’energia che salverà gli uomini e annienterà l’ignoranza: questa energia è quella immensa, gigantesca voglia che ci attanaglia la mente e che si chiama curiosità. ( comunicato originale del 21/08/2017: http://LAMPOON.IT/magazine/keep-on-shining-2017/ )






L’attore Alessandro Preziosi indossa l'orologio TIFFANI & Co. - 2 settembre 2017. Courtesy of Grazia Lotti Relazioni Pubbliche




con Raffaella Banchero, amministratore delegato di Tiffany & Co. in Italia e in Spagna. Courtesy of Grazia Lotti Relazioni Pubbliche

2 e 3 pubblicate da LuxGallery.it tra quelle selezionate quali migliori look della 5ª giornata della Mostra del Cinema di Venezia 74


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PATRICIA 22



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MessaggioInviato: Mar Set 19, 2017 00:38    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, in this letter Vincent tells Gauguin about his tired eyes, his excitement that he's coming to see him, his work, and the weather.


From: Vincent van Gogh
To: Paul Gauguin
Date: Arles, Wednesday, October 17, 1888

My dear Gauguin,
Thanks for your letter, and thanks most of all for your promise to come as early as the twentieth.

(Note: Gauguin was to arrive in Arles on Tuesday, October 23, 1888. This must be a reference to a new letter from Gauguin, and not the one van Gogh said that he had received in a previous letter otherwise he would undoubtedly have told Theo then that Gauguin wanted to come on October 20.)

Agreed, this reason that you give won’t help to make a pleasure trip of the train journey, and it’s only right that you should put off your journey until you can do it without it being a bloody nuisance. But that apart, I almost envy you this trip, which will show you, en passant, miles and miles of countryside of different kinds with autumn splendours.

(Note: Gauguin was still in poor health.)

I still have in my memory the feelings that the journey from Paris to Arles gave me this past winter.How I watched out to see ‘if it was like Japan yet’! Childish, isn’t it?

(Note: van Gogh had made the journey from Paris to Arles on Sunday, 19 and Monday, February 20, 1888)

Look here, I wrote to you the other day that my vision was strangely tired.

(Note: This must have been van Gogh’s reply to the letter from Gauguin referred to in a previous letter. He also wrote about his tired eyes to Theo.)

Well, I rested for two and a half days, and then I got back to work. But not yet daring to go outside, I did, for my decoration once again, a no. 30 canvas of my bedroom with the whitewood furniture that you know.

(Note: The letter sketch The bedroom is after the painting The bedroom.)

Ah, well, it amused me enormously doing this bare interior. With a simplicity à la Seurat. In flat tints, but coarsely brushed in full impasto, the walls pale lilac, the floor in a broken and faded red, the chairs and the bed chrome yellow, the pillows and the sheet very pale lemon green, the blanket blood-red, the dressing-table orange, the washbasin blue, the window green. I had wished to express utter repose with all these very different tones, you see, among which the only white is the little note given by the mirror with a black frame (to cram in the fourth pair of complementaries as well).

Anyway, you’ll see it with the others, and we’ll talk about it. Because I often don’t know what I’m doing, working almost like a sleepwalker. It’s beginning to get cold, especially on the days when the mistral blows. I’ve had gas put in the studio, so that we’ll have good light in winter.

Perhaps you’ll be disillusioned with Arles if you come at a time when the mistral’s blowing, but wait... It’s in the long term that the poetry down here soaks in.
You won’t find the house as comfortable yet as we’ll gradually try to make it. There are so many expenses, and it can’t be done in one go. Anyway, I believe that once here, like me, you’ll be seized with a fury to paint the autumn effects, in between spells of the mistral. And that you’ll understand that I’ve insisted that you come now that there are some very beautiful days. Au revoir, then.

Ever yours,
Vincent


"God has given you one face, and you make yourself another."
―William Shakespeare

"The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is."
―Winston Churchill


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.

_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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genziana



Registrato: 22/03/04 13:40
Messaggi: 33260

MessaggioInviato: Mar Set 19, 2017 12:32    Oggetto: RAI ITALIA 20-21/09/17 PASSIONE SINISTRA film di Marco PONTI Rispondi citando







    Cinema RAI ITALIA - ALESSANDRO PREZIOSI in

    PASSIONE SINISTRA: 20 e 21 SETTEMBRE 2017

    con Valentina Lodovini, la regia di MARCO PONTI

    produzione: Bianca Film, Rai Cinema con MiBACt

cast: Vinicio Marchioni, Eva Riccobono, Geppi Cucciari




ORARI America/Asia/Australia www.raitalia.it/dl/PortaliRai/Page-ab48738e-506a-4d73-8abb-09248a9db82b.html





Questa settimana “Cinema Italia”, trasmissione di RAI ITALIA dedicata a cicli, rassegne tematiche e appuntamenti del cinema italiano scelti e presentati dal giornalista e critico Gianni Farina, propone il film “PASSIONE SINISTRA” (2013) di Marco Ponti.

Nina (Valentina Lodovini) è cresciuta a pane e politica. Idealista, integralista e decisamente di sinistra, crede in quello che fa ed è convinta del fatto che si possa lottare per un mondo migliore. Vive con Bernardo (Vinicio Marchioni), giovane intellettuale e scrittore di imminente – ma non ancora conclamato – successo: uno destinato a fare la giovane promessa per tutta la vita. Niente di più diverso da Giulio (Alessandro Preziosi), erede di una famiglia di industriali, che più arrogante e qualunquista non si può. Uno che l’idea del mondo migliore non lo sfiora neppure. Non a caso è fidanzato con Simonetta (Eva Riccobono), una simpatica biondezza che ogni tanto inciampa persino sui congiuntivi. Ma Nina e Giulio casualmente si incontrano. Ed è odio a prima vista. Esattamente il tipo di uomo che lei disprezza, che ha sempre disprezzato. Esattamente il tipo di donna che lui ignora, che ha sempre ignorato. Mondi diversi, pensieri diversi, ideali (o non ideali) diversi, se non fosse che il confine fra odio e amore è molto labile e basta poco a ridisegnare la geometria sentimentale di due coppie apparentemente solide. Perché quando la passione li travolge (una passione inquietante, dice lei, una passione…sinistra!) sembra che ogni presunta certezza venga distrutta ed ogni differenza azzerata, tanto da rischiare di sconvolgere le loro esistenze. Ma è proprio vero che in amore niente regole?


Programmazione: su Rai Italia 1 (Americhe), New York/Toronto mercoledì 20 settembre alle ore 19.30, Buenos Aires il 20 alle ore 20.30, San Paolo il 20 alle 20.30; su Rai Italia 2 (Australia – Asia), Pechino/Perth giovedì 21 alle ore 17, Sydney giov. 21 alle ore 19.





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PATRICIA 22



Registrato: 27/08/16 08:28
Messaggi: 283
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MessaggioInviato: Mer Set 20, 2017 00:19    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Alessandro, in this letter, one of Vincent's shortest, he speaks, "a few most sincere and profound words of friendship" to "Pauly." Laughing

From: Vincent van Gogh
To: Paul Gauguin
Date: Arles, Friday, January 4, 1889

My dear friend Gauguin
I’m taking advantage of my first trip out of the hospital to write you a few most sincere and profound words of friendship. I have thought of you a great deal in the hospital, and even in the midst of fever and relative weakness.

Tell me. Was my brother Theo’s journey really necessary – my friend? Now at least reassure him completely, and yourself, please. Trust that in fact no evil exists in this best of worlds, where everything is always for the best.

(Note: These words are quoted from the ‘philosopher’ Pangloss in Voltaire’s Candide (1759), where they occur repeatedly. The novel tells the story of the journey of the young, open-minded Candide, who is driven out of the palace where he lives. He has learned from the household philosopher Pangloss that he lives in the best possible world: ‘Tout est pour le mieux dans le meilleur des mondes’. During his wanderings Candide encounters a great deal of misery (so that he begins to have doubts), but nonetheless in the end he calls for fortitude with the cry: ‘we must cultivate our own garden’ (il faut cultiver notre jardin)

So I want you to give my warm regards to good Schuffenecker –
to refrain from saying bad things about our poor little yellow house until more mature reflection on either side – to give my regards to the painters I saw in Paris.

I wish you prosperity in Paris. With a good handshake

Ever yours,
Vincent

Roulin has been really kind to me, it was he who had the presence of mind to get me out of there before the others were convinced.
Please reply.

(Note: van Gogh means that Roulin had arranged for him to leave the hospital for a short while on January 4. On that day Roulin wrote to Theo: ‘Monsieur the house doctor felt slightly anxious about letting him go out; I told him that I would be in charge of accompanying him and seeing that he returns to the hospital’)


"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare


Love ya Preziosi! Later! me.

_________________
Patricia.

"Hell is empty and all the devils are here."
―William Shakespeare
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mayte



Registrato: 25/09/15 20:30
Messaggi: 363
Residenza: BARCELONA

MessaggioInviato: Mer Set 20, 2017 07:05    Oggetto: Re: RAI ITALIA 20-21/09/17 PASSIONE SINISTRA film di Marco P Rispondi citando


Veramente divertnte questo film!!



genziana ha scritto:





    Cinema RAI ITALIA - ALESSANDRO PREZIOSI in

    PASSIONE SINISTRA: 20 e 21 SETTEMBRE 2017

    con Valentina Lodovini, la regia di MARCO PONTI

    produzione: Bianca Film, Rai Cinema con MiBACt

cast: Vinicio Marchioni, Eva Riccobono, Geppi Cucciari



ORARI America/Asia/Australia www.raitalia.it/dl/PortaliRai/Page-ab48738e-506a-4d73-8abb-09248a9db82b.html





Questa settimana “Cinema Italia”, trasmissione di RAI ITALIA dedicata a cicli, rassegne tematiche e appuntamenti del cinema italiano scelti e presentati dal giornalista e critico Gianni Farina, propone il film “PASSIONE SINISTRA” (2013) di Marco Ponti.

Nina (Valentina Lodovini) è cresciuta a pane e politica. Idealista, integralista e decisamente di sinistra, crede in quello che fa ed è convinta del fatto che si possa lottare per un mondo migliore. Vive con Bernardo (Vinicio Marchioni), giovane intellettuale e scrittore di imminente – ma non ancora conclamato – successo: uno destinato a fare la giovane promessa per tutta la vita. Niente di più diverso da Giulio (Alessandro Preziosi), erede di una famiglia di industriali, che più arrogante e qualunquista non si può. Uno che l’idea del mondo migliore non lo sfiora neppure. Non a caso è fidanzato con Simonetta (Eva Riccobono), una simpatica biondezza che ogni tanto inciampa persino sui congiuntivi. Ma Nina e Giulio casualmente si incontrano. Ed è odio a prima vista. Esattamente il tipo di uomo che lei disprezza, che ha sempre disprezzato. Esattamente il tipo di donna che lui ignora, che ha sempre ignorato. Mondi diversi, pensieri diversi, ideali (o non ideali) diversi, se non fosse che il confine fra odio e amore è molto labile e basta poco a ridisegnare la geometria sentimentale di due coppie apparentemente solide. Perché quando la passione li travolge (una passione inquietante, dice lei, una passione…sinistra!) sembra che ogni presunta certezza venga distrutta ed ogni differenza azzerata, tanto da rischiare di sconvolgere le loro esistenze. Ma è proprio vero che in amore niente regole?


Programmazione: su Rai Italia 1 (Americhe), New York/Toronto mercoledì 20 settembre alle ore 19.30, Buenos Aires il 20 alle ore 20.30, San Paolo il 20 alle 20.30; su Rai Italia 2 (Australia – Asia), Pechino/Perth giovedì 21 alle ore 17, Sydney giov. 21 alle ore 19.





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Marisol



Registrato: 07/01/11 10:40
Messaggi: 3437
Residenza: Madrid

MessaggioInviato: Mer Set 20, 2017 10:22    Oggetto: Rispondi citando


Divertente e piacevole film Laughing Very Happy !!!

Ci sono tre argomenti che si consiglia di non parlare in una riunione: di politica, di calcio e di religione Rolling Eyes ...

Parlare di questi temi, può rendere la piacevole riunione, diventare un campo di battaglia Sad , dove tutti i presenti vogliono avere ragione Sad , possono anche, rompere qualche amicizia di diversi anni Crying or Very sad !!

Ora bene, se parliamo l'amore Wink ... la cosa può cambiare perché, non esiste una teoria che dice che i poli opposti attraggono??

Questo film è un esempio chiaro Wink Razz !!



In amore niente regole? In verità, non lo so, ma so che dove c'è amore, non c'è nessun ostacolo Wink Razz !!

Tanti baci con grande affetto sincero da Madrid Razz

TVTb Ale Wink

Marisol






genziana ha scritto:





    Cinema RAI ITALIA - ALESSANDRO PREZIOSI in

    PASSIONE SINISTRA: 20 e 21 SETTEMBRE 2017

    con Valentina Lodovini, la regia di MARCO PONTI

    produzione: Bianca Film, Rai Cinema con MiBACt

cast: Vinicio Marchioni, Eva Riccobono, Geppi Cucciari



ORARI America/Asia/Australia www.raitalia.it/dl/PortaliRai/Page-ab48738e-506a-4d73-8abb-09248a9db82b.html





Questa settimana “Cinema Italia”, trasmissione di RAI ITALIA dedicata a cicli, rassegne tematiche e appuntamenti del cinema italiano scelti e presentati dal giornalista e critico Gianni Farina, propone il film “PASSIONE SINISTRA” (2013) di Marco Ponti.

Nina (Valentina Lodovini) è cresciuta a pane e politica. Idealista, integralista e decisamente di sinistra, crede in quello che fa ed è convinta del fatto che si possa lottare per un mondo migliore. Vive con Bernardo (Vinicio Marchioni), giovane intellettuale e scrittore di imminente – ma non ancora conclamato – successo: uno destinato a fare la giovane promessa per tutta la vita. Niente di più diverso da Giulio (Alessandro Preziosi), erede di una famiglia di industriali, che più arrogante e qualunquista non si può. Uno che l’idea del mondo migliore non lo sfiora neppure. Non a caso è fidanzato con Simonetta (Eva Riccobono), una simpatica biondezza che ogni tanto inciampa persino sui congiuntivi. Ma Nina e Giulio casualmente si incontrano. Ed è odio a prima vista. Esattamente il tipo di uomo che lei disprezza, che ha sempre disprezzato. Esattamente il tipo di donna che lui ignora, che ha sempre ignorato. Mondi diversi, pensieri diversi, ideali (o non ideali) diversi, se non fosse che il confine fra odio e amore è molto labile e basta poco a ridisegnare la geometria sentimentale di due coppie apparentemente solide. Perché quando la passione li travolge (una passione inquietante, dice lei, una passione…sinistra!) sembra che ogni presunta certezza venga distrutta ed ogni differenza azzerata, tanto da rischiare di sconvolgere le loro esistenze. Ma è proprio vero che in amore niente regole?


Programmazione: su Rai Italia 1 (Americhe), New York/Toronto mercoledì 20 settembre alle ore 19.30, Buenos Aires il 20 alle ore 20.30, San Paolo il 20 alle 20.30; su Rai Italia 2 (Australia – Asia), Pechino/Perth giovedì 21 alle ore 17, Sydney giov. 21 alle ore 19.





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La vera ricchezza è prendere la vita con amore, donando amore.



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